City of Night pdf epub – Mariahilff.de

I just saw in the NYTimes that Grove is putting out the 50th anniversary edition my heart stopped for just a second, and even as I m writing this my stomach has that forbidden fruit feeling of something thrilling and frightening this way coming It s the same feeling I got well into my adult years when driving into NYC an tici pation In 1963 I was a 17 years old and a totally alienated wanna be hipster beatnik reaching out for anything dark and maybe beautiful I saw the American dream as I just saw in the NYTimes that Grove is putting out the 50th anniversary edition my heart stopped for just a second, and even as I m writing this my stomach has that forbidden fruit feeling of something thrilling and frightening this way coming It s the same feeling I got well into my adult years when driving into NYC an tici pation In 1963 I was a 17 years old and a totally alienated wanna be hipster beatnik reaching out for anything dark and maybe beautiful I saw the American dream as a klieg lit freak show, and wanted nothingthan the shadows City of Night was a primer, and a baby step into the world I was actually going to find myself in a few years later I don t know how this book holds up, but it gets its five stars for the impact it had on me way back then I m glad to see it s still available, and amazed that its reissue has caused me such a visceral reaction on this fog bound, living room comfortable, cozy and warm Thanksgiving morning City of Night, as I remember it, is a powerful, dead on depiction of the gay underworld of the late 50 s, early sixties For a young gay man, and occasional trick turner, it was a book that spoke to my experience in a world that did not want me to be There is a particular scene in the book that stays with me still During a Mardi Gras celebration, the protagonist we never know his name leaps on to a float carrying a beautiful young drag queen Kathy, and her hustler lover Jocko and asks Kat City of Night, as I remember it, is a powerful, dead on depiction of the gay underworld of the late 50 s, early sixties For a young gay man, and occasional trick turner, it was a book that spoke to my experience in a world that did not want me to be There is a particular scene in the book that stays with me still During a Mardi Gras celebration, the protagonist we never know his name leaps on to a float carrying a beautiful young drag queen Kathy, and her hustler lover Jocko and asks Kathy why she is smiling Because I m going to die , she says.I ve never forgotten that particular moment in the book The whole of the book is encapsuled in that book the tawdry glitter, the desperation under the affirmation of self.I once met Mr Rechy at gay fund raiser and tried to speak to him about the why of the story and the why of that particular scene He was taciturn, almost rude Later I decided it was that I was too gushing in my praise and it made him uneasy Maybe he was just tired of explaining it to idiots I was so young, then.One thing I did learn from the book and from my own experiences is that tricks and Johns need each other and yet are so often contemptuous of each other.This is a perfect book for those who have known only After Stonewall It is a history of the shadows gay people had to wrap around themselves.I know that my words here are not a review, proper I don t have the background to comment on pure literary merit It is, however, what it is Truly gripping and evocative The ending was so incredibly touching The book is filled with moments that perfectly capture the alienated gay culture of the 60s in an at times shocking way In addition to the sullen and often mellow persona of John s personality, there are also moments punctuated here where drag queens just bring it ON Colorful personalities bloom everywhere around him This book is made of awesome and the prose is nothing less than gorgeous A lot of this reminded me of Jack K Truly gripping and evocative The ending was so incredibly touching The book is filled with moments that perfectly capture the alienated gay culture of the 60s in an at times shocking way In addition to the sullen and often mellow persona of John s personality, there are also moments punctuated here where drag queens just bring it ON Colorful personalities bloom everywhere around him This book is made of awesome and the prose is nothing less than gorgeous A lot of this reminded me of Jack Kerouac, if he wasrefined and could concentrate better This isstreamlined than Kerouac s work, and though both shared a love for the scope of the American road and cityscapes, this is a memorable book for being one of the first to openly depict the often over or underlooked gay scene that was so consistently marginalized So when the gushing honesty of its characters overflows onto the page, do not be surprised to find yourself in awe of what this book actually accomplishes I m not sure exactly what I expected from this novel, but it wasn t that it would break my heart so very many times over Wow I get why James Baldwin was such a fan. CITY OF NIGHT is what you get when you cross headlong, Beat Generation writing with a young man s emerging sense of self as gay and it s a shocking and wonderful meld indeed This 1963 novel stunned readers when it first appeared the narrator whose father s friends demanded he give them a thousand, his youth as a hustler, the lurking, intense romanticism of various American entertainment districts The novel combines an understanding not only of the insistent drumbeats of gay sexuality a CITY OF NIGHT is what you get when you cross headlong, Beat Generation writing with a young man s emerging sense of self as gay and it s a shocking and wonderful meld indeed This 1963 novel stunned readers when it first appeared the narrator whose father s friends demanded he give them a thousand, his youth as a hustler, the lurking, intense romanticism of various American entertainment districts The novel combines an understanding not only of the insistent drumbeats of gay sexuality and male emotion but also the orange drink and popcorn scented center of the seediest American cities, ca 1960 It can be read as gay lit, of course, or simply as Americana, hot and heavy I think it succeeds on both counts John Rechy went on to write many other books, most notably THE SEXUAL OUTLAW, but in my opinion this one is his best I stumbled upon this gay cult classic accidentally and went into it without knowing its status or significance Though, the latter became apparent as I read Published in 1963, it s a picture of the underground gay culture pre Stonewall, filled with excellent sociological observation and a cast of colourful characters even if some of them become a little on the nose I m looking at you, Nazi masochist with daddy issues.The character s journey of wanting love but fearing it and running away fr I stumbled upon this gay cult classic accidentally and went into it without knowing its status or significance Though, the latter became apparent as I read Published in 1963, it s a picture of the underground gay culture pre Stonewall, filled with excellent sociological observation and a cast of colourful characters even if some of them become a little on the nose I m looking at you, Nazi masochist with daddy issues.The character s journey of wanting love but fearing it and running away from it wasn t maybe as ground breaking but his circumstances must ve been a novelty for a 1960s reader obviously those readers who didn t live those circumstances themselves The public loved the book, but many reviewers were condescending and treated the author as some idiot savant, denying the book a true literary value that comes from careful consideration, or even straight out denying the existence of John Rechy The narrator of the book never admits to himself he is gay, and in self delusion insists he only turns tricks for money, and like many others in his position, fully believes one day he will abandon this life and start a wholesome heterosexual existence the only place where real love is possible Meanwhile he performs the fantasy of masculinity for his clients Of course, he keeps returning to this demimonde in every city he goes to New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, New Orleans, but never allowing himself true intimacy with another human being He reacts with anger and contempt for anyone who attempts to get close to him The reader gets a glimmer of hope that the narrator can free himself from his all consuming self loathing and get a happy ending of sorts if only the post orgasm shame could be overcome At least we can comfort ourselves with the knowledge that the author of this semi autobiographical novel found love and happiness in the end Read this book if you re tired of the polished, Mad Men like vision of the 50s in America When John Rechy s explosive first novel, City of Night, was first published in , it became a national bestseller and ushered in a new era of gay fiction Bold and inventive in his account of the urban underworld of male prostitution, Rechy is equally unflinching in his portrayal of one hustling Youngman and his restless search for self knowledge As the narrator careens from El Paso to Times Square, from Pershing Square to the French Quarter, we get an unforgettable look at a neon lit life on the edge Said James Baldwin of the author, Rechy is the most arresting young writer I ve read in a very long time His tone rings absolutely true, is absolutely his own and he has the kind of discipline which allows him a rare and beautiful reckless Amazingly overdone It s one of those books that I read really, really slowly just because I didn t want it to be over Emotionally I think it touched on a lot of stuff I related to and haven t read about before , to the point where I was willing happy, even to overlook things like the description of a hot dog cart as a relic from Hell. I gave it four stars so you know I enjoyed it But that doesn t mean I don t have a song and dance to tell you about it now Let s commence shaking tailfeathers on this, but only one apiece I don t want any injuries Now, let s talk GRAMMAR It s a freaking important part of our language It can change entire meanings of phrases and sentences But there are those that like to give you that I m an artist and it s how I form my craft line When really it s turd And you do NOT want to I gave it four stars so you know I enjoyed it But that doesn t mean I don t have a song and dance to tell you about it now Let s commence shaking tailfeathers on this, but only one apiece I don t want any injuries Now, let s talk GRAMMAR It s a freaking important part of our language It can change entire meanings of phrases and sentences But there are those that like to give you that I m an artist and it s how I form my craft line When really it s turd And you do NOT want to see how some of us form that art I digress What I meant to say was that Senor Rechy walks the fine line of those that can pull this off and those straight blow it I understand the stream of conscience writing style, I mean I m from Kerouac s hometown for godsakes But don t pussyfoot around it You can t just whimsically use commas and apostrophes one second and throw them to the wind the next Gotta pick a side of the fence homey That being said, one very important note I d like to bring attention to in this is that it is the first book I ve ever read with the phrase sunbleached pubic hair in it I know you re shocked that I haven t dug that one up before I didn t say I hadn t WRITTEN the phrase, just that I hadn t read it elsewhere Pick up those dropped jaws kids Which is maybe why I give Mr Rechy bonus points OR, perhaps because I really enjoyed his language and prose throughout it I may never have been a transient male prostitute in my life yet , but something rings true and warm in my soul with such quotes as The heart is deceitful above all things I m not lying that is BRILLIANT I honestly just may have it tattooed on me His life may not be your cup of tea, but I guarantee that everyone finds a way to relate to the life lessons he learns.To the protagonist, the end of youth is a kind of death And he spends his life running from that death Held jobs, but the street lured him back every time Sure he could work a 9 to 5 so why keep returning to the streets for me it s crack, but for him, it s muchit s that early life crisis we all have after college and when we re supposed to settle down and marry and have a family Except usually we just go to Vegas and get a lil buckwild and a lil over it It s never so easy for everyone But everyone wants a taste of that sinister life It s their draw to Mardi Gras and Vegas They just want a taste of the city of night but not to reside there However, some people are just drawn to it like some are drawn to be artists or engineers It s a trade those who aren t a part of don t understand But then that all comes tumbling down when he s questioned why he does it by someone who knows all too well to avoid his worst fear of having to love someone I will admit that thought is horrifying Just THINK of all the x mas and anniversary and valentine s day gifts Good god Bloodsuckers Digressing again, he s deathly afraid to place himself in a vulnerable situation as I feel we all honestly are You don t want to leave yourself exposed to hurt, but it s the only way you can truly fill that void of loneliness Instead, he fills that need w people who want him, but only in brief interludes so to never chance having to reciprocate emotions.All and all this book carries muchweight than the premise of it seems to entail Which is why I gave it four stars But work on that grammar homey I m only letting it slide once before I hi five your face I wanted to like this bookI really did Having been born post the AIDS HIV discovery era, I was always fascinated by the kind of lifestyle previous to that, and at the same time, felt repulsed by it to a certain degree The first chapters of this book are remarkable Simply magnificent The memories of childhood the narrator describes are so evocative and realistic it s unbelievable Many quotes to remember and many things to delve into and take from The language is the kind of language I wanted to like this bookI really did Having been born post the AIDS HIV discovery era, I was always fascinated by the kind of lifestyle previous to that, and at the same time, felt repulsed by it to a certain degree The first chapters of this book are remarkable Simply magnificent The memories of childhood the narrator describes are so evocative and realistic it s unbelievable Many quotes to remember and many things to delve into and take from The language is the kind of language I always loved the language I wish I could manipulate the same way Rechy does He can actually touch the words, feel them, weigh them, know their texture and taste Rechy doesn t know what dashes or apostrophes mean, but that s exactly what sets him apart he denies playing by the rules and he structures a whole different universe in which he is the king Even if he tries too hard to prove he deserves the crown.But what didn t appeal to me in this book is the majority of the stories I feel there are many we could have done without The characters despite their proximity to realism feel contrite today anyway and don t make the gay community look beyond what the stereotypes for it say It s depressing and heavy and a spoonful down your throat I loved the beginning and ending sequences and the sentence which ends this book is simply brilliant But at the end of the day, I think Rechy himself describes my feelings for this book in his last paragraphs And what has been found Nothing A circle which winds around, without beginning, without end.