[ Read Prime ] Clap When You LandAuthor Elizabeth Acevedo – Mariahilff.de

In A Novel In Verse That Brims With Grief And Love, National Book Award Winning And New York Times Bestselling Author Elizabeth Acevedo Writes About The Devastation Of Loss, The Difficulty Of Forgiveness, And The Bittersweet Bonds That Shape Our LivesCamino Rios Lives For The Summers When Her Father Visits Her In The Dominican Republic But This Time, On The Day When His Plane Is Supposed To Land, Camino Arrives At The Airport To See Crowds Of Crying People In New York City, Yahaira Rios Is Called To The Principal S Office, Where Her Mother Is Waiting To Tell Her That Her Father, Her Hero, Has Died In A Plane CrashSeparated By Distance And Papi S Secrets The Two Girls Are Forced To Face A New Reality In Which Their Father Is Dead And Their Lives Are Forever AlteredAnd Then, When It Seems Like They Ve Lost Everything Of Their Father, They Learn Of Each Other


10 thoughts on “Clap When You Land

  1. chai ♡ chai ♡ says:

    find this review others on my blog It is hard to describe the space that yawned open in the life of Camino Rios and Yahaira Rios after their father died in a flight crash It is harder still to describe the truths he left behind, cutting swift and deep, like a knife Camino and Yahaira are sisters who, for sixteen years, hadn t known of each other s existence Their world too had tipped, and fallen, and the secrets their father held aloft over their heads are seized by gravity Now it w find this review others on my blog It is hard to describe the space that yawned open in the life of Camino Rios and Yahaira Rios after their father died in a flight crash It is harder still to describe the truths he left behind, cutting swift and deep, like a knife Camino and Yahaira are sisters who, for sixteen years, hadn t known of each other s existence Their world too had tipped, and fallen, and the secrets their father held aloft over their heads are seized by gravity Now it was just the two of them, and the slow, outgoing tide of aftermath.Camino and Yahaira are both desperately pawing for the truth of their father as they might paw at beach sand in hopes of finding a shell, hunting in the rubble of his life for answers, and trying to find their way to each other across the Rubicon that divided their two worldsOn the screen, beyond where she can see, I trace her chin with my finger for the first time I don t just feel loss I don t feel just a big gaping hole at everything my father s absence has swallowed Look at what it s spit out offered Look at who it s given meThere s no doubt that Acevedo is one of the brightest literary talents around.Tender, patient and raw as a wound, Clap When You Land burrows deep under its reader s skin while at the same time nudging them into inhabiting the perspective of its characters The author possesses a unique musicality for language her writing buoys and soothes at once, and I wanted nothingthan to breathe the words in until they ached inside my chest, to nestle into the story s steady warmth like a well worn sweater But for all the novel s poetry and lyricism, Acevedo never forgets to tell a gripping tale.There s a chafed, bruised feeling to this book, and something in me splintered while reading it Clap When You Land is a novel that explores the wrenching depths of what it feels like to lose something and be unable to move on, not only a literal person, but also a way of life This is Cami and Yaya s story of weary grief and visceral longing the novel alternating between their voices but you are in there too, and that makes their loss your loss, the ache your ache, the anger you anger, and the secrets their father had sealed away inside him like a box with another box inside it and another inside something you too must process and come to terms with yourself All of it burgeoning within you with every turn of the page, welling up like tears And that owes in huge part to the author s deft, tender characterizations, and the way she artfully infuses her novel with great empathy offering the reader so many questions, but not giving any direct or easy answers.Yaya and Cami s father had been the life of their small universe, and without him their world felt huge and empty, like a shipwreck hull They loved him, and they mourned him, but they also wondered if they could ever really forgive him In the fraying cobwebs of their memories, the side of their father that they saw was polished to such a high gloss of perfection the loving, attentive father but it is now vying with this newly revealed side of him the terrible husband, the selfish man and the two are clashing like swords Does one side cancel out the other Will Cami and Yaya ever be able to think of him and see only the word father and not the things he left behind This is the gift and curse both Yahaira and Camino are wrestling with throughout the story Camino and Yahaira didn t have to articulate the curious shape of their grief because they could see it mirrored in each other s eyes Cami, on the one hand, is grateful, but she can t help but think a little bit secretly and resentfully in her heart that life for Yahaira has been as easy as pulling strings Yahaira, after all, got to live with their father nine months a year in their New York apartment, while Cami is the one he left behind, fighting off the unwanted advances of an older neighbor who refused to take no for an answer Yahaira, on the other hand, can see the sadness in Cami s anger, the guardedness of grief, and she s grappling with her own relationship to her mother, both of them filled with a sadness that they could not articulate without fracturing their relationship.As for other thematic notes, the novel probes achingly at the question of identity, what it means to grow up in a world you felt only halfway inside of, and to question your claim to your parents roots when you ve never set foot in their world The novel cracks open all that wordless agony like an egg and leaks out the words Can you be from a place you have never been You can find the island stamped all over me, but what would the island find if I was there Can you claim a home that does not know you, much less claim you as its own The author also skillfully articulates how different tragedies are portrayed in the media, especially the ones that touch a marginalized community, and how those stories tend to be quickly robbed of their sharp edges, easily dismissed even while those communities are still wrestling with the loss.That said, Acevedo tempers the sting of that harsh reality with the beauty of hope in a way that is deeply affecting Yahaira and Camino s feelings are twins, even if they are not, and the ravine between them gets smaller enough to close with every page There s also so much sapphic tenderness nestled into this story Yahaira and Dre s relationship filled me with so much warmthI tell her that when we land some people on the plane might clap She turns to me with an eyebrow raised I imagine it s kind of giving thanks Of all the ways it could end it ends not with us in the sky or the water, but together on solid earth safely groundedSo much about this novel tugged at my heartstrings, and I highly recommend you pick it up ko fi blog twitter tumblr


  2. Emily May Emily May says:

    A queenoffers her hand to be kissed, can form it into a fistwhile smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author s obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about Tragedies happen all the time Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics terrorism, school shootings, for example but some are left to be grieved only by thos A queenoffers her hand to be kissed, can form it into a fistwhile smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author s obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about Tragedies happen all the time Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics terrorism, school shootings, for example but some are left to be grieved only by those directly affected The rest of the world goes on as normal, not seeing the pain inflicted on the community in question.In November 2001, flight AA587 crashed to the ground on its way to Santo Domingo, killing 265 people on a flight where 90% of the passengers were Dominican or of Dominican descent Noting that it was not another terrorist attack, the media largely ignored it, but it was a terrible blow to the New York Dominican community.Clap When You Land is the story of two girls Camino and Yahaira one in the Dominican Republic and one in New York City They have never met, never spoken, never known about each other s existence, but when their father is killed in a plane crash on his way to visit Camino, they find each other in the midst of their grief.Both girls have their own struggles, but Camino is especially threatened without her father to protect her Now the local pimp, a man called El Cero, is hanging around, following her All she wants is to escape, study premed, have a chance at something better Then along comes Yahaira and turns her life upside down, changes everything she thought she knew about her father So he created a theater of his life got lost in all the different roles he had to play. This is another part of the book and I thought it was done really well Part of the girls discovery of each other is also the discovery that maybe their father wasn t quite the man they thought he was That he wascomplex, had many flaws That even though he was a good father, he might not have been a good husband In this, the book is something of a bildungsroman Both girls are matured by the intensity of the loss and the discoveries made after.It is a beautiful story that finds a lot of warmth and hope in the darkness of loss My only complaint is that Camino and Yahaira s voices were a little too similar I found it especially hard to distinguish the two in the beginning and had to look for other markers to remember whose chapters we were on But it s a small complaint Highly recommended for those who enjoyed The Poet X and other novels in verse.Facebook Instagram


  3. Zoë Zoë says:

    Elizabeth Acevedo books are such a joy to read, and this was no exception Though it dealt largely with grief following a tragedy, the audiobook felt like such a comfort I loved the two narrators both the characters and the actual audiobook narrators and how their stories were mirror images but also very personal Highly recommend


  4. Cindy Pham Cindy Pham says:

    Acevedo writes poetically and passionately like always, and her audiobooks are always great The book explores themes of grief, family, and cultural differences that would be great for her young adult audience to read.Personally, I would have enjoyed a deeper exploration of grief and the way both girls grapple with the complexities of their family stories There s a lot to tap into there, but their voices were quite similar to the point where it became difficult sometimes to remember who was spe Acevedo writes poetically and passionately like always, and her audiobooks are always great The book explores themes of grief, family, and cultural differences that would be great for her young adult audience to read.Personally, I would have enjoyed a deeper exploration of grief and the way both girls grapple with the complexities of their family stories There s a lot to tap into there, but their voices were quite similar to the point where it became difficult sometimes to remember who was speaking This madesense when Acevedo reveals in her author s note that she hadn t made the decision to split into two POVs until later on, so the two protagonists didn t feel distinctive enough The sister relationship also has a lot of potential to be exploreddeeply, but we barely got to see them spend much time interacting with each other and coming to terms with one another I wishtime had been devoted to the relationship between the two protagonists rather than spending 2 3 of the book reading a repetition of their same reactions.Still a very solid YA book and would recommend to teens


  5. Chelsea (chelseadolling reads) Chelsea (chelseadolling reads) says:

    Every time I read an Elizabeth Acevedo book, I think that it can t possible top her previous work, but every time I am so, so wrong This is my favorite of Acevedo s works yet I very rarely cry while listening to audiobooks, but this one had me sobbing while washing dishing and I just loved it so fucking much I recommend this book to absolutely EVERYONE TW death of a parent, plane crashes, stalking, sexual assault


  6. Warda Warda says:

    I don t need to read the blurb to know that I will be reading this book No diggety, no doubt.


  7. Nilufer Ozmekik Nilufer Ozmekik says:

    This is so poignant, lyrical, heartfelt, well conceived, true to life, sublime, extremely emotional novel about two sisters bounding story who never knew each other till an unexpected accident shatters their lives and takes their father away from them Elizabeth Acevedo s poetry combines with the heartwarming story based on true events on November 2001, American Airlines Flight 587 flight was regularly scheduled to fly from JFK International Airport to Las Americas Airport in Santa Domingo but This is so poignant, lyrical, heartfelt, well conceived, true to life, sublime, extremely emotional novel about two sisters bounding story who never knew each other till an unexpected accident shatters their lives and takes their father away from them Elizabeth Acevedo s poetry combines with the heartwarming story based on true events on November 2001, American Airlines Flight 587 flight was regularly scheduled to fly from JFK International Airport to Las Americas Airport in Santa Domingo but it crashed into Belle Harbor on the Rockaway Peninsula of Queens, took 260 people s lives and nearly %90 was Dominican and of Dominican descent Tragedy might be forgotten but it truly affected the lives and shaken Dominican community of New York to the core According one of the writers of NY Times For Dominicans those journeys to the home were defining their complex push pull relationship with their homeland At the very same accident two girls lost their father Camino lives in Dominican Republic and Yahaira lives in NY Camino goes to the airport to summon her father and after seeing the crying crowds of people, she startles in shock, in the meantime in New York, Yahaira is summoned to the principal s office to get the tragic news They don t have enough time to digest the news when they learn double life of their father Now they are dealing with their grief, starting to learn about each other, trying too hard to adapt in their new lives They also need to accept the fact their father is not the perfect man they adored Only true thing may help them move on their lives he really loved both of them Especially Camino s new life conditions will bechallenging because she lives in a dangerous territory, chasing by a man named El Cero who is a local pimp She just wants to lay low and survive, studying premed and being a normal teenager This is so intense story consisting sensitive elements like sexual assault, grief, plane crush, betrayal, dysfunctional family dynamics Sometimes you feel the burning sensation coming from your heart during your read and you want to stop for taking few breaths because the characters already conquered your soul and it s so natural to ache and deeply care for them But at the end all those suffering and emotional stress you endured are truly worth it because this is unique and beautiful sisterhood story brighten your mood and it is one of the best young adult fiction novels of the year Overall I enjoyed it and I highly recommend it.bloginstagramfacebooktwitter


  8. myo & myo & says:

    Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again I actually do think that she is one of my favorite authors because when she writes in verse, her work just touches me differently The way she writes is just so beautiful and she has these one liners that just leave you thinking This story of two sisters was absolutely amazing and i already want to reread so that i can annotate it


  9. Heather Heather says:

    This book was amazing.I love how it was written in verse I m usually not into books written in verse but this one was just so stunning The story of two teens living two different lives realize they havethan they think in common.This book tackles so many things, race, grief, sexual assault, family, andIt will be a book that sticks with you and the characters as well.


  10. leynes leynes says:

    Okay, so here goes, I had very high expectations for Clap When You Land because The Poet X is one of my favorite books from last year Since then I have looked up many videos by Acevedo, some of which are her performing her poetry, others simple interviews or book club discussions, and I have really fallen in love with her personality and the way she breathes power into her poetry Elizabeth Acevedo truly is something special when it comes to writing and performing poetry There are only a few p Okay, so here goes, I had very high expectations for Clap When You Land because The Poet X is one of my favorite books from last year Since then I have looked up many videos by Acevedo, some of which are her performing her poetry, others simple interviews or book club discussions, and I have really fallen in love with her personality and the way she breathes power into her poetry Elizabeth Acevedo truly is something special when it comes to writing and performing poetry There are only a few people with her gift currently being published Unfortunately, Clap When You Land didn t meet all of my, granted, incredibly high expectations I desperately wanted to read it because on top of it being written by Acevedo, the premise two sisters who had formerly not known about each other find their way toward one another through the death of their father sounded too cool to pass it up I love me a good novel written in verse and I thought it could be cool to see Acevedo grappling with the topics of grief, mourning and confusion over having to reconcile the fact that your father lied to you and lead a double life with one family in New York and the other in the Dominican Republic However, in my humble opinion, this novel was overburdened by its themes and the pacing was just off The two girls, Yahaira and Camino, sadly, never felt real to me The way they reacted to their father s death and betrayal felt flat to me because they felt flat Their emotions didn t feel real and everything about their feelings felt a little blurry This is such a complex story and I didn t feel like we got the necessary exposure to the five stages of grief and how differently these girls would go through them Unfortunately, both girls voices and reactions were very similar to one another In the audiobook it was therefore nearly impossible at least in the beginning to keep them apart I always mixed them up And that s not a good sign Two people are never the same but the way these girls were thinking in almost exactly the same way, it was beyond bizarre I heard Elizabeth Acevedo say that she had planned this book to be only written from one POV but then another author gave her the suggestion to tell the other sister s story as well And whilst I like the idea of that I think we can still see that Acevedo had formerly worked with just one POV and the added POV was really just an afterthought In regards to the pacing, I was simply confused by how this novel was split time wise We spent so much time pre funeral so pre the girls meeting each other and I don t understand why The novel only got really good once Yahaira flew to the DR to meet Camino for their father s funeral On top of the themes of grief, loss and betrayal, Clap When You Land is also about sexual harassment Yahaira details one horrific story in which she was molested during a train ride when she was younger, and Camino is currently dealing with the threat of the local pimp, who is stalking her and wants her to work for him This pimp, El Sero, is truly one of the most disgusting characters I ever saw in YA contemporary and the threat of his presence was very palpable However, similar to my first complaint, I feel like this complex subject matter was not discussed in depth enough Even though El Sero was constantly on Camino s mind we didn t really see how his disgusting behaviour took a toll on her mentally On top of that, I don t appreciate all these YA books pushing the message that it s normal for teenagers to not open up with their problems to their parents, and seek parental help for protection So please, if you similarly to Camino have a good relationship to your parents or guardians, DEFINITELY tell them when someone is stalking you and making you feel unsafe and uncomfortable Do not keep it a secret I just want to seeYA books where behaviour like this aka seeking help and communicating with your parents is normalised because in this story it really comes down to the pimp trying to rape Camino and just because Yahaira figured out where she might ve been, they managed to get out of that horrific situation And sure, that hasshock value, but I m not here for it Even though, I am of course here for Thea wielding that fucking machete at El Sero and summoning her Gods We gotta stan that woman Also, the ending, with Camino moving to NY with Yahaira didn t explore what that would really mean I don t think Acevedo went for a happy happy ending this time, it was supposed to be bittersweet with Camino having to give up her home in order to have a safe safer life, however, I really wantedfrom that and explore Camino s feelings further Sure, we saw her crying at the airport, not wanting to leave her aunt, feeling guilty but in my humble opinion, Camino having to leave the DR was the most heartbreaking part of this book The consequences of the disruption and abruption of her life, just thinking about it opens up a vastness that I can t put into words I hated how that was handled on three pages by Acevedo, almost as if she shrugged off the meaningfulness of this life altering event.But even though this book had many shortcomings, I still feel very comfortable giving it three stars because A the premise was good and something I haven t seen done in YA before, B the representation in this book is flawless again and not just in regards to our beautiful Black queens I really have to give a shoutout to Acevedo for flawlessly weaving queer characters into all of her books as well, Acevedo is really out here calling out all other authors who still can t seem to manage that and C her writing is just beautiful and funnily enough, something that I wouldn t have expected, even suspenseful This book had me on the edge of my seat at times