download eBook Queer (In)Justice: The Criminalization of LGBT People in the United StatesAuthor Joey L. Mogul – Mariahilff.de

This book is excellent It was a hard read mostly because it is obviously not the most uplifting subject matter This book is a grim reminder that we have come a long way but really not as far as we think and being able to marry is awesome but we can t forget about other rights either I am talking about basic human rights so called gay rights are basic human rights, period Sorry if you do not get that and being treated equally under the law and in our courts and yes even in our prison This book is excellent It was a hard read mostly because it is obviously not the most uplifting subject matter This book is a grim reminder that we have come a long way but really not as far as we think and being able to marry is awesome but we can t forget about other rights either I am talking about basic human rights so called gay rights are basic human rights, period Sorry if you do not get that and being treated equally under the law and in our courts and yes even in our prisons not just mainstream acceptance We have to stop punishing people who do not fit society s norms gender or otherwise whether they be LGBT or straight We have to stop thinking that because someone is different then they must be up to something criminal or out to get us all or make LGBT look bad We also have to understand that some of us get into trouble with the law gasp and we should be treated equally in our courts and prisons and not worse or forced to be humiliated or abused or even worse assumed automatically guilty cause we do not fit some impossible white male hetero normative world view or ideal We all have to stop blaming the victim as well I think this book should be required reading for all in law enforcement and legal professions We live in a country and world where heteronormativity, the system of framing heterosexuality constrained within a nuclear family structure and shaped by raced, classed, and rigidly dichotomous constructions of gender is predicated as fundamental to society, and as the only natural and accepted form or sexual and gender expression Daily exposure to white supremacist, colonial, patriarchal, gendered and heterosexual norms, reinforced in infinite ways, consciously and unconsciously over We live in a country and world where heteronormativity, the system of framing heterosexuality constrained within a nuclear family structure and shaped by raced, classed, and rigidly dichotomous constructions of gender is predicated as fundamental to society, and as the only natural and accepted form or sexual and gender expression Daily exposure to white supremacist, colonial, patriarchal, gendered and heterosexual norms, reinforced in infinite ways, consciously and unconsciously over hundreds of years, can literally change how we are able to think about these issues.Queer, transgendered and gender nonconforming people are threatening because they place in question identities previously conceived as stable, unchallengeable, grounded and known , which serve as critical tools of heterosexist culture When people feel challenged in engaging in the rigid classification of individuals as male and female, gay and straight, an individual s mere presence in public spaces is experienced as a disruption of the social order Rise up and fight.Power to the People from my review in Monthly Review In 1513, en route to Panama, Spanish conquistador Vasco Nunez de Balboa ordered forty Quaraca men to be ripped apart by his hunting dogs Their offense Being dressed as women and having sexual relations with each other The homophobia and transphobia behind Balboa s actions are far from arcane relics of the past, and violence against LGBTQ people continues to this day, both legally sanctioned and in the streets.In 2008, Duanna Johnson, a black transgender wom from my review in Monthly Review In 1513, en route to Panama, Spanish conquistador Vasco Nunez de Balboa ordered forty Quaraca men to be ripped apart by his hunting dogs Their offense Being dressed as women and having sexual relations with each other The homophobia and transphobia behind Balboa s actions are far from arcane relics of the past, and violence against LGBTQ people continues to this day, both legally sanctioned and in the streets.In 2008, Duanna Johnson, a black transgender woman, was arrested for a prostitution related offense in Memphis At the jail, she was brutally beaten by a police officer Her beating was caught on videotape, leading to the firing of two officers Johnson filed a civil suit against the police department but, less than six months later, was found shot in the head a few blocks from her house This was the third killing of a black transgender woman in Memphis in 2008 alone, and her murder remains unsolved.Queer In Justice examines the violence that LGBTQ people face regularly, from attacks on the street to institutionalized violence from police and prisons The three authors are long time advocates and attorneys who work directly with people impacted by incarceration Joey L Mogul, a partner at Chicago s People s Law Office and Director of the Civil Rights Clinic at DePaul University, has advocated for LGBTQ people ensnared in the criminal legal system Andrea Ritchie is a police misconduct attorney, organizer, and coordinator of Streetwise and Safe, a New York City organization focused on gender, race, sexuality, and poverty based policing and criminalization of LGBTQ youth of color Kay Whitlock has worked for almost forty years to build bridges between LGBTQ struggles and movements fighting for racial, gender, economic, and environmental justice Together, they center race, class, and gender gender nonconformity in analyzing the myriad ways in which LGBTQ people have been policed, prosecuted, and punished from colonial times to the present day.Rest of my review at This is, as far as I m concerned, a must read.It s a sharp analysis of the criminalization of sexual diversity and gender variance, and centers the experiences of people of color, people living in poverty, immigrants, and trans women and men The writing is very concrete, with lots of stories and evidence to back up the authors critiques Really sharply written and thoroughly researched, and its obvious that the authors are activists who are working on these issues and interacting with queer co This is, as far as I m concerned, a must read.It s a sharp analysis of the criminalization of sexual diversity and gender variance, and centers the experiences of people of color, people living in poverty, immigrants, and trans women and men The writing is very concrete, with lots of stories and evidence to back up the authors critiques Really sharply written and thoroughly researched, and its obvious that the authors are activists who are working on these issues and interacting with queer communities directly, not studying them from afar.The reason I m only giving it four stars instead of five, however, is that there wasn t enough attention paid to the ways in which the, uh, gaystream has played a role in denying rights to criminalized people, especially trans women, people who do sex work, and immigrants Although they touch on this a bit in the last chapter when comparing responses to the Matthew Shepard murder to responses to the Duanna Johnson beating and murder, it s a missed opportunity The Duanna Johnson didn t get the kind of attention the Matthew Shepard case did not just because they media glommed onto the Shepard story, but also because LGB rights groups did not make enough noise about the Johnson case I ll leave you with this quote, an important thing to chew on Yet as LGBT movements have institutionalized, visions of queer liberation have been tamed into a narrow rhetoric of equality within existing systems rahter than challenges to the systemic violence and oppression they produce Ruthann Robinson puts it bluntly LGBT rights agendas are premised on an understanding that distance from criminality is a necessary condition of equality A groundbreaking work that turns a queer eye on the criminal legal system, and winner of thePASS Prevention for a Safer Society Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Drawing on years of research, activism, and legal advocacy, Queer In Justice is a searing examination of queer experiences as suspects, defendants, prisoners, and survivors of crime The authors unpack queer criminal archetypes like gleeful gay killers, lethal lesbians, disease spreaders, and deceptive gender benders to illustrate the punishment of queer expression, regardless of whether a crime was ever committed Tracing stories from the streets to the bench to behind prison bars, the authors prove that the policing of sex and gender both bolsters and reinforces racial and gender inequalities A groundbreaking work that turns a queer eye on the criminal legal system, Queer In Justice illuminates and challenges the many ways in which queer lives are criminalized, policed, and punished I had hoped that this book would be the gay equivalent of Michelle Alexander s stellar The New Jim Crow, but it s not It lacks the measured and systematic structure of that book, as well as its style The research in In Justice is fantastic and fascinating, but it fails to cohere as either a work of argument or a work of advocacy. a must for anyone seeking a comprehensive yet very readable analysis of the subjugation and ciminalization of queer folks. I rated this book 3 stars mainly for the importance of the content Honestly, it was a little hard for me to read because it read like an essay and the subject was of course depressing I found myself feeling disoriented at times by the flow of the book and sometimes the same thing was repeated several times even if it was in slightly different ways I assume this was to drive the point home but I found myself wondering Didn t I just read about that I think the book could have been condensed I rated this book 3 stars mainly for the importance of the content Honestly, it was a little hard for me to read because it read like an essay and the subject was of course depressing I found myself feeling disoriented at times by the flow of the book and sometimes the same thing was repeated several times even if it was in slightly different ways I assume this was to drive the point home but I found myself wondering Didn t I just read about that I think the book could have been condensed into a large essay, a smaller book it s already fairly short , or a research paper This is a phenomenal, heavily source book detailing the criminalization of LGBTQ people in the United States, dating from the beginning of American colonization to present day Wonderfully written and an excellent resource that is just as timely now as it was when it was written almost ten years ago. The authors of Queer In Justice set out to prove two complementary theses The first deals with the tendency of the criminal legal system to dealharshly with LGBT citizens than with others, and to assume guilt or criminality on the basis of that orientation identity It is difficult, based on the evidence they produce, to disagree on this point The second thesis is equally compelling, although less thoroughly argued or defended within the LGBT community at large, LGBT individuals who The authors of Queer In Justice set out to prove two complementary theses The first deals with the tendency of the criminal legal system to dealharshly with LGBT citizens than with others, and to assume guilt or criminality on the basis of that orientation identity It is difficult, based on the evidence they produce, to disagree on this point The second thesis is equally compelling, although less thoroughly argued or defended within the LGBT community at large, LGBT individuals who also belong to minorities are bothpersecuted by the legal system and, largely, ignored by LGBT rights groups in favor of theeasily defensible white gay male In fairness, this second point is harder to demonstrate due to the susceptibility of minority status in general to such discrimination, but even so, the authors choose somewhat weak targets for example, increased violence toward LGBT Muslims in the aftermath of 9 11 may have little to do with their LGBT identities and much to do with their overarching religious or ethnic backgrounds There may be a case here to be made, but a choice of less ambiguous examples would be warranted in order to make it.In any case, whether or not the second hypothesis is warranted, the first in itself demands attention The authors highlight specifically the weaknesses inherent in the dominant hate crime approach to dealing with anti LGBT violence giving enhanced punishment capability to law enforcement is pointless if it is law enforcement that ignores these crimes in the first place.They conclude The choice to pursue strategies that rely on increased policing and punishment to produce safety for queers requires a leap of faith that the system can and will be able to distinguish between the good or reputable gay, lesbian, or transgender victim and the bad, presumptively criminalized queers Such faith is deeply misplaced p 146.Since the LGBT community cannot rely on legal institutions to provide for their security, the authors argue, it is necessary for the LGBT community to create innovative ways of protecting and policing itself They point to action groups that are networking with local businesses to establish Safe Spaces and Safe Havens as unofficial refuges for victims of anti LGBT violence, and developing HIV AIDS education and support mechanisms within the American penitentiary system The only way to get out of the box LGBT individuals have been placed in by the structural deficiencies of the criminal legal system, they argue, is to think outside of it.Queer In Justice is a fascinating and extremely disturbing, yet totally indispensable read, and gives important insight into the plight of the LGBT community in the United States and the extent to which they continue to struggle for equality before the law As the authors seek to illustrate, LGBT inequality goes far, far beyond the issue of marriage in many ways, they argue, that is the least of their concerns