Read Online StonewallAuthor Martin Duberman – Mariahilff.de

The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar in New York s Greenwich Village At a little after one am on the morning of June the police carried out a routine raid on the bar But it turned out not to be routine at all Instead of cowering the usual reaction to a police raid the patrons inside Stonewall and the crowd that gathered outside the bar fought back against the police The five days of rioting that followed changed forever the face of lesbian and gay life In the years since , the Stonewall riots have become the central symbolic event of the modern gay movement Renowned historian and activist Martin Duberman now tells for the first time the full story of what happened at Stonewall, recreating in vivid detail those heady, sweltering nights in Juneand revealing a wealth of previously unknown material This landmark book does even it unforgettably demonstrates that the Stonewall riots were not the beginning just as they were certainly not the end of the ongoing struggle for gay and lesbian rights Duberman does all this within a narrative framework of novelistic immediacy Stonewall unfolds through the stories of six lives, and those individual lives broaden out into the larger historical canvas All six came of age in the pre Stonewall era, and all six were drawn into the struggle for gay and lesbian rights as a result of the upheaval at the Stonewall bar and the events that followed


10 thoughts on “Stonewall

  1. Michael Michael says:

    Scholarly but accessible, Stonewall surveys the state of gay life in America during the sixties and early seventies The work tells the story of the time s seismic cultural and political shifts through the biographies of six influential gay, lesbian, and trans persons Craig Rodwell, Yvonne Flowers, Karla Jay, Forest Gunnison, Sylvia Rivera, and Jim Fouratt Drawing upon extensive archival research, Duberman details the small victories of the conservative homophile movement of the 50s and 60s, Scholarly but accessible, Stonewall surveys the state of gay life in America during the sixties and early seventies The work tells the story of the time s seismic cultural and political shifts through the biographies of six influential gay, lesbian, and trans persons Craig Rodwell, Yvonne Flowers, Karla Jay, Forest Gunnison, Sylvia Rivera, and Jim Fouratt Drawing upon extensive archival research, Duberman details the small victories of the conservative homophile movement of the 50s and 60s, before he shifts to overviewing the aspirations and legacies of the radical gay organizations that sprouted in the wake of the Stonewall Rebellion All the while, he sketches realistic portraits of each of his six major subjects, and makes clear the horrors of the closet as well as the impact Stonewall had on everyday life for LGBT people The book s methodology feels archaic, but it offers a clear, if not especially nuanced, account of a chaotic time


  2. Theresa Alan Theresa Alan says:

    After the second night of rioting, it had become clear to many that a major upheaval, a kind of seismic shift, was at hand I d been wanting to brush up on the history of Stonewall June 27, 1969 because I d forgotten most of what I learned in school In 1999, on the 30th anniversary of Stonewall, it had been my first time in New York City I d met up with an ex boyfriend, who could be described as moderate to conservative We were just wandering around the city with no plans when we stumbled After the second night of rioting, it had become clear to many that a major upheaval, a kind of seismic shift, was at hand I d been wanting to brush up on the history of Stonewall June 27, 1969 because I d forgotten most of what I learned in school In 1999, on the 30th anniversary of Stonewall, it had been my first time in New York City I d met up with an ex boyfriend, who could be described as moderate to conservative We were just wandering around the city with no plans when we stumbled on the gay pride parade AT THE INTERSECTION OF STONEWALL AND CHRISTOPHER STREET which is where the riots took place I knew the significance, at least part, but even conservative Scott had a great time at the parade.So when I saw this book on NetGalley, I was thrilled I gotthan I bargained for Part of this felt very academic and like I was back in grad school, but most of it was just very readable history that focuses on six different gay and lesbian activists including a black woman, three white men, a Latino transvestite, and a Jewish woman What I remembered most clearly from whatever gender studies class I took when I learned about Stonewall was that male police officers would shove their hands down women s pants to be sure she was wearing female appropriate underwear If a person with pudenda that marked them as having one sex on their birth certificate wasn t wearing at least three pieces of gender appropriate clothing AS DEEMED BY NEW YORK LAW, he or she could be arrested Can you imagine what a waste of a cops time to go around harassing gay people for being gay I didn t realize that Stonewall was a dive bar run by mafia Because in the sixties gay folks had no rights and could indeed be arrested, the mafia saw a way to make money and gay folks didn t have alternatives because someone who was openly gay could be denied a loan It s still legal to discriminate against the LGBTQ community in 31 states So marriage is legal, but in many states you can be fired simply for your sexual orientation or that you identify differently than what your birth certificate says Right now in Texas they are trying to pass legislation to allow it to be OK to deny homosexuals health care I did know that lots of black women were slow to join to identify as feminist, partially because white feminists were concerned with middle class white women issues and weren t immediately on board with the idea that feminism has to deal with race and class as well as gender The Black Panthers were very male dominated, as were many of the emerging groups trying to get equal rights for the LGBTQ community Men were used to dominating the discussion and talked over women who the males thought should be fetching coffee with their mouths firmly closed In that period of history, there was considerable disagreement among the gay community about whether or not it was important to look respectable suits and ties for men and dresses for women and what queens place was in the revolution.There had already been much activism before the nights of the Stonewall riots, which lasted basically two days and resulted in a fair amount of destruction of property and injured cops and severely injured beaten up activists Obviously, in 1969, the Civil Rights Movement was in full swing Second wave feminism MLK had been shot the year before And, of course, what unified just about everyone on the left, the Vietnam war If you re interested in history as it pertains to gender and civil rights, this is very well done It was originally published in 1994 and updated to mark the 50th anniversary of the riots Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book Forreviews, please visit


  3. Barbara Barbara says:

    Duberman is a master at weaving together stories of individual lives to write history He chose six disparate individuals four men and two women to tell the story of the development of the Gay Rights Movement Stonewall refers to the riots that occurred from June 27 July 2, 1969 in and around the Stonewall bar in Greenwich Village Duberman s history reveals that despite the fact that Stonewall is known as the event that started the modern Gay Rights movement, this is a great over simplifica Duberman is a master at weaving together stories of individual lives to write history He chose six disparate individuals four men and two women to tell the story of the development of the Gay Rights Movement Stonewall refers to the riots that occurred from June 27 July 2, 1969 in and around the Stonewall bar in Greenwich Village Duberman s history reveals that despite the fact that Stonewall is known as the event that started the modern Gay Rights movement, this is a great over simplification of the actual facts.The six featured individuals in the book include Foster Gunnison who led a conservative life, and was a proponent of the strategy that gay men and lesbians should conform in dress and behavior and work for acceptance Karla Jay was a radical feminist who had to hide her sexual orientation in some of the women s groups she worked within Yvonne Flowers was an African American woman who faced racism and sexism in most of the gay groups she tried to work with Craig Rodwell was raised in a Christian Scientist residential school and founded the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookstore in the Village, while still holding on to his Christian Science beliefs Jim Fouratt was part of the radical left One of the most compelling individuals was Sylvia Rivera Ray Sylvia is identified as a drag queen in the book and a transvestite prostitute But her sexual identity might now be considered transgender She considered surgery, but only briefly She d been on the streets from the age of 11, and wanted to help other street kids like her.The most fascinating part of the book were the descriptions of the internal political struggles over tactics There were endless arguments over whether the struggles of gay men and lesbians should join in with other major efforts such as the Black Panthers and the anti war movement against the war in Vietnam At that time, there was little mention of individuals who identified as bisexual Although surgery was a very expensive option for individuals who didn t identify with the gender they were born, in the late 60 s there was little or no awareness of gender identity The book was written in 1993, and even then, the label applied to Sylvia was transvestite Transexual is used in footnotes, a reminder that language is constantly evolving.In 1993, all the individuals whose stories make up this history were still alive The Oscar Wilde Bookstore closed in 2009 citing competition from online booksellers Craig Rodwell the proprietor died of cancer in 1993 he was 53 , though Duberman describes him as still the proprietor in the book published in 1993 Jim Fouratt is 71 and still an activist Karla Jay is professor emeritus at Pace University Foster Gunnison passed away in 1994 1925 1994 I found a reference to the late Yvonne Flowers Rivera passed away at the age of 50 of liver cancer Rivera, Fouratt, Jay and Rodman are all in Wikipedia Gunnison and Flowers were harder to find In the case of Yvonne Flowers it seems that Black Lesbian Feminism is still a very marginalized identity and history


  4. Russell Sanders Russell Sanders says:

    My copy of Martin Duberman s Stonewall has sat on my bookshelf unread for almost twenty years What prompted me to finally read it is two fold I realized that I knew almost nothing about the Stonewall Riots, and as a gay man, I should know my next novel will end with this very important piece of gay history, so I needed to read this book as research I was not disappointed and wish I d read it years ago Duberman s book is an exhaustive history of that era of burgeoning gay rights He cloaks h My copy of Martin Duberman s Stonewall has sat on my bookshelf unread for almost twenty years What prompted me to finally read it is two fold I realized that I knew almost nothing about the Stonewall Riots, and as a gay man, I should know my next novel will end with this very important piece of gay history, so I needed to read this book as research I was not disappointed and wish I d read it years ago Duberman s book is an exhaustive history of that era of burgeoning gay rights He cloaks his history in the stories of six diverse people who were right there in the midst of it all Each of them is a person to whom we can relate, for though they are very real people, they also represent distinct types that people the gay community There is the wealthy older man who wants everyone to remain civilized and demand their rights, yet not rock the boat There is a young actor with his delicate good looks and flowing blond hair There is the black woman, fighting for lesbian rights in the midst of the struggle for racial equality as well and having a hard time feeling like she fits in There is the young scholarly athletic woman who resents being expected to declare herself one of the prescribed lesbian categories of the time butch or femme There is the founder of the Oscar Wilde Bookshop who seeks to form an organization that will fight for gays to be anything they wish to be, but most of all, out and proud And there is the street prostitute, transvestite, drag queen who starts her life on the streets at the tender age of eleven and never looks back The six of them cross paths many times in this journey to gay equality Duberman, in using the very personal stories of these six, turns his story from a dry history to an intimate biography of an important time in history not just Gay History, but American History as well For when the drag queens at the Stonewall Inn finally fought back and refused to be denigrated by the corrupt and brutal police that early morning after Judy Garland s burial the previous afternoon, they changed all our lives, gay and straight


  5. James James says:

    If there s any one thing that has the potential to evoke instant violence from individuals, it s the idea of homosexuality Today, nothing seems to polarize so many people Anyone growing up has heard fag as a basic insult in the grammer of teenagers and beyond, and I really suspect there s a lot of people who are in the closet in some way that know that if they came out at all of even being remotely attracted to members of the same sex however you want to define that , then they would becom If there s any one thing that has the potential to evoke instant violence from individuals, it s the idea of homosexuality Today, nothing seems to polarize so many people Anyone growing up has heard fag as a basic insult in the grammer of teenagers and beyond, and I really suspect there s a lot of people who are in the closet in some way that know that if they came out at all of even being remotely attracted to members of the same sex however you want to define that , then they would become an instant target for former friends and family It s even worse in the countryside than in the cities, too So I picked up Stonewall to brush up on some Queer history, especially since the Stonewall Riots of 1969 in New York are often cited as being a turning point in the acceptance of anything but straight as an arrow by mainstream society at all Stonewall details the lives of seven different individuals from their childhoods, to the day they came out of the closet, to their lives afterward and up until the stonewall riots, and the aftermath The six people are Yvonne Maua Flowers, Jim Fouratt, Foster Gunnison Jr, Karla Jay, Silvia Rae Rivera, and Craig Rodwell Some like Jim Fouratt were previously involved in radical left wing groups like the Yippies before Stonewall brought gay issues as an issue to be seriously considered Yvonne Flowers felt out of place wherever she went, being a black lesbian and therefore subject to homophobia and sexism in much of the black community and racism in much of the white lesbian community Foster Gunnison Jr was the son of an industrialist, and became extremely involved in the moderate Mattachine Society, which sought to seek an understanding with straight society Karla Jay was a student who became involved with left wing activism but quickly was uncomfortable about male domination of the movement Silva Rae Rivera defiantly strikes the reader as one of the most interesting, as she lives on the streets as a queen, and transvestite Finally, Craig Rodwell was a young member of the Mattachine Society and tried to turn itradical and relevant by recruiting young members into it to infuse it with energy, and later opened the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookstore Without going to far, the Stonewall Riots started when the police raided the notoriously seedy, and Mafia run, Stonewall Bar Raids were common place and often were proceeded with warnings, bribes, and such, but this time after the police roughed up a few people, the crowd fought back It escalated into a full scale attack on the police and lots of pent up rage was unleashed The next day, as news of gays fighting back spread quickly, people took to the street and made a statement that they would no longer be silent second class citizens After this, the Gay Liberation Front was founded to push for confrontation and demand, not request, full equality with straight society The effects on the characters reminded me of the effect that the Seattle protests against the World Trade Organization had on me when I was a teenager It all the sudden became alright to be out in the open The book itself can be a little confusing at points as Dr Duberman switches between the individuals stories quickly and suddenly, but each story is indeed pretty interesting Even today as there seems to be an enormous backlack by the Christian Right to attack the rights of people to be attracted to anyone, or to BE anyone, that they feel like, and to have access to all of the same health, jobs, and life that any straight person would, it really was the beginning of hope back in an age of closets and not being able to even talk This was a beginning of change, before even the onslaught of the AIDS epidemic Stonewall should be read by anyone who believes in the right of anyone to struggle for a better life for themselves and those they care about


  6. Cari Cari says:

    Less a portrait of the Stonewall riots anda history of the blooming gay rights movement of the sixties, Stonewall is solid in its presentation of the cultural atmosphere and the stories of six individuals deeply involved in activist activity The events of Stonewall itself are given their own section in the book, although the conflicts and passions that set the stage are delved into and analyzed muchthoroughly, which is actually the most intriguing part of the read The surrounding h Less a portrait of the Stonewall riots anda history of the blooming gay rights movement of the sixties, Stonewall is solid in its presentation of the cultural atmosphere and the stories of six individuals deeply involved in activist activity The events of Stonewall itself are given their own section in the book, although the conflicts and passions that set the stage are delved into and analyzed muchthoroughly, which is actually the most intriguing part of the read The surrounding history is what draws in the reader, although it does drag occasionally and it s a push to keep going The effort is worth it although the ending seems rushed and everything is wrapped up a little too neatly, considering the ongoing struggle and devastating incidents that still plague the gay lesbian community today, especially among the younger generations.Note the way Duberman switches perspectives between the six is difficult to follow in the beginning and I found it almost impossible to remember the youthful histories of each, but that didn t detract from the rest of the book As he getsinto the flow of his narrative, the hop between points of view gets much easier to follow and remember.Stonewall is written with a tight focus and what feels like a genuine passion for the subject matter, so read it for the history, read it for the perspective, and read it to gain a broader understanding, no matter your orientation


  7. Jamie Jamie says:

    Much broader and deeper than one riot, which is why it s so important to know history The most disheartening part is how much momentum was lost because the antiwar, Black, feminist, gay and lesbian movements were intent on excluding each other How muchprogress could have been made Also, this, by way of history repeatingFor the better part of a week, the police, with little or no provocation, literally assaulted antiwar demonstrators and yippies alike, spilling so much blood, and bas Much broader and deeper than one riot, which is why it s so important to know history The most disheartening part is how much momentum was lost because the antiwar, Black, feminist, gay and lesbian movements were intent on excluding each other How muchprogress could have been made Also, this, by way of history repeatingFor the better part of a week, the police, with little or no provocation, literally assaulted antiwar demonstrators and yippies alike, spilling so much blood, and bashing onlookers, reporters, and freaks so indiscriminately, that TV images of their rampaging brutality produced national revulsionThat s the Chicago Democratic Convention, 1968


  8. Joshua Joshua says:

    I feel bad not giving a book about the defining mythic and historic moment of 20th century gay American history five stars, but integrity is important As a queer man Stonewall is something that I cannot ignore Even though I didn t grow up during a time when being gay could get you institutionalized, I did grow up in a town and social environment where being gay just wasn t good It was better to be closeted and be a good christian boy who only centered your desire on the opposite sex I won t I feel bad not giving a book about the defining mythic and historic moment of 20th century gay American history five stars, but integrity is important As a queer man Stonewall is something that I cannot ignore Even though I didn t grow up during a time when being gay could get you institutionalized, I did grow up in a town and social environment where being gay just wasn t good It was better to be closeted and be a good christian boy who only centered your desire on the opposite sex I won t insult the people who lived during this period by saying I completely understand their struggle, but the closet is something that is timeless and known to every generation of gay people I know Stonewall by its reputation, by it s significance, by its historic precedence, and by the mythic status it holds in the queer community.Because of all this, I wanted this book to beMartin Duberman has written a beautiful oral history about a few of the principle characters that participated in the Stonewall Riots, but his work I not entirely centered on the actual riots themselves Instead this book is the history of a handful of individuals who were present or were impacted by the events of Stonewall And while this isn t a bad method or approach, by the nature of the title of the book I was expecting the book to be solely centered on the riots themselves Stonewall is a tipping point in the minds of many people, and so the problem with this book is that I was expectedanalysis and historical understanding about the event rather than the people who were changed by it.There s also a profound lack of information about Marsha P Johnson, the trans woman of color who supposedly threw the first brick, but that s it s own review.This is an incredible book, and a vital read for anyone interested in the queer political politics, and Duberman to his credit does write many passages where he explores the realities of being gay in America before Stonewall This book is brilliantly written, demonstrates a careful attention to research, and is a loving testament to the men and women who began a protest that allows queer people like me to be out and open without fear Stonewall is a beautiful book and well worth the reader s time


  9. Frances Frances says:

    My friend gave me this book a few years ago, and I was in no hurry to read it, as the movie that is based on the book was notorious for downplaying the role of people of color The movie, from what I could see in the trailer and from what friends and reviews said as well , insists that the main character, a fictional white cis guy, be the catalyst for change, which isn t supported by any story of Stonewall that I ve heard That being said, I m very glad I read it.Stonewall doesn t actually occu My friend gave me this book a few years ago, and I was in no hurry to read it, as the movie that is based on the book was notorious for downplaying the role of people of color The movie, from what I could see in the trailer and from what friends and reviews said as well , insists that the main character, a fictional white cis guy, be the catalyst for change, which isn t supported by any story of Stonewall that I ve heard That being said, I m very glad I read it.Stonewall doesn t actually occupy itself so much with the event as with the growing pains of the gay rights movement Duberman does a great job of emphasizing how it s hard to nail down a linear, easy to understand narrative of Stonewall, as people s testimonies vary so widely what matters, the reader is led to understood, is that something changed, or clicked, for so many people after June 28, 1969.The book follows six people from childhood to Stonewall, an approach that I appreciated, even if the men were emphasized over the women Duberman, a white gay guy, is thoughtful in how the gay rights movement often excluded people of color and lesbians and didn t really have a great appreciation for intersectionality I liked this attention to often overlooked narratives, especially since this book was published in 1994 A quote that shows Duberman s critical eye Many men in GLF Gay Liberation Front supported the women s movement, and some of them gave it a good dealthan lip service Still, they had been socialized as men and despite good intentions and vigorous efforts at self examination in consciousness raising groups, many proved unable to rid themselves of the assumption that their male insights were superior, that their male leadership essential, their male issues paramount Something that really bothered me at the beginning of the book was Duberman s flippant treatment of childhood sexual abuse As a survivor of childhood sexual abuse myself, I was disturbed to read sentences like, The neighbors had begun to tease her Sylvia Rivera s mother about Ray s effeminacy, predicting he would soon be a full fledged maric n What they didn t know was that he had already, at age seven, had sex with his fourteen year old cousin and by age ten was having sex regularly with a married man down the block I would never casually characterize such situations as consensual.This book came at the right time for me and I actually felt inspired to do something after I read it And in its examination of the inner discord of the homophile and gay rights movements, I found comfort that a group of loud, shouty, obnoxiously self righteous I say that with respect people who disagreed with each other 50% of the time could get their shit together and effect change I also felt a renewed respect for the thousands of nameless people that were behind the movement and worked tirelessly to make themselves and their community feel heard It reminded me of how I felt when I read And the Band Played On So many people dedicated so much of their time, money, and effort, often at great personal cost, simply because they knew what they were doing was right.Near the end, I felt that Duberman lost a lot of his steam The book ends a bit quickly, lacking the thoughtful analysis that characterizes previous chapters.All in all, a great book and definitely well worth the read, especially if you re feeling down about the bickering going on in the left


  10. Blue Blue says:

    Read this for a course I took.While I do believe Stonewall is one of the most important events in LGBTQ history, I believe there are much better books ont eh subject than this one.There is very little on Stonewall itself, it mostly discusses the lives of the characters before the events, and what they did after the events of that night.And only one of the characters was even there at Stonewall that night and two of them joined in later, the other 3 were not at the event or the days that fol Read this for a course I took.While I do believe Stonewall is one of the most important events in LGBTQ history, I believe there are much better books ont eh subject than this one.There is very little on Stonewall itself, it mostly discusses the lives of the characters before the events, and what they did after the events of that night.And only one of the characters was even there at Stonewall that night and two of them joined in later, the other 3 were not at the event or the days that followed, so I m not sure why they were included in the book.It was pretty obvious in reading this that Duberman cared for two of the characters a lotthan he did the other 4, creating a bias towards white gay males over everyone else, and that is NOT what Stonewall was about.An okay book but not a great one