Zami – Mariahilff.de

ZAMI Is A Fast Moving Chronicle From The Author S Vivid Childhood Memories In Harlem To Her Coming Of Age In The Late s, The Nature Of Audre Lorde S Work Is Cyclical It Especially Relates The Linkage Of Women Who Have Shaped HerLorde Brings Into Play Her Craft Of Lush Description And Characterization It Keeps Unfolding Page After Page Off Our Backs


10 thoughts on “Zami

  1. mark monday mark monday says:

    in college, in the late 80s and early 90s, i discovered that i had two aunts this is one and this is another aunt Audre intimidated me at first she was a stern, moody, melancholy woman who had lived a life of so many ups and downs but as i got to know her, her innate gentleness became clear this was a woman with so much empathy and understanding for the people around her this was a lady who had felt pain in her life and would be able to understand my pain as well she told me stories of in college, in the late 80s and early 90s, i discovered that i had two aunts this is one and this is another aunt Audre intimidated me at first she was a stern, moody, melancholy woman who had lived a life of so many ups and downs but as i got to know her, her innate gentleness became clear this was a woman with so much empathy and understanding for the people around her this was a lady who had felt pain in her life and would be able to understand my pain as well she told me stories of that life and those stories were filled with poetry and passion she told me about growing up in harlem...


  2. Zanna Zanna says:

    I did not know this was a book about love.More than anything,than about New York City in the 50s,than being Black and gay and poor and female in that uneasy time,than about the sensuality of food and the precise pleasures of style,than about hustle and poetry and Audre s fraught relationship with her mother and the longing for an unknown home, for Granada and Carriacou, it is about loving women I must add that these things are not separable I cannot in any kind of fait I did not know this was a book about love.More than anything,than about New York City in the 50s,than being Black and gay and poor and female in that uneasy time,than about the sensuality of food and the precise pleasures of style,than about hus...


  3. Shanna Hullaby Shanna Hullaby says:

    My new favorite book Lorde tells all the secrets I was too afraid to tell in languageeloquent than my dreams.


  4. Aaron Aaron says:

    Audre Lorde s beatiful autobiography of her child and early adulthood She s been prized for her sensuality in writing but this is no chicklit her account of the lesbian bar scene in 1950 s America will fascinate anyone interested...


  5. El El says:

    I went into this book knowing very little about Audre Lorde other than she was a black, lesbian poet I may have read some of her poetry back in college, but I am shocked Zami wasn t assigned reading at the time.My parents were not West Indian, I am not a lesbian, I didn t grow up in Harlem in the fifties, I wasn t alive during the bombing of Pearl Harbor, I didn t have to leave the country because of McCarthyism although I d like to leave for not dissimilar reasons And yet this book spoke to I went into this book knowing very little about Audre Lorde other than she was a black, lesbian poet I may have read some of her poetry back in college, but I am shocked Zami wasn t assigned reading at the time.My parents were not West Indian, I am not a lesbian, I didn t grow up in Harlem in the fifties, I wasn t alive during the bombing of Pearl Harbor, I didn t have to leave the country because of...


  6. Jonathan Jonathan says:

    My second time reading this, the first being many years ago as an undergrad, has reinforced my love for this book, and my love for Lorde herself, her prose, poetry and essays all of which you should go check out She is right about so much, and so much of what she says we desperately need to hear in these broken and divided times These are not from this book, but I share them anywaySometimes we are blessed with being able to choose the time, and the arena, and the manner of our revolution, My second time reading this, the first being many years ago as an undergrad, has reinforced my love for this book, and my love for Lorde herself, her prose, poetry and essays all of which you should go check out She is right about so much, and so much of what she says we desperately need to hear in these broken and divided times These are not from this book, but I share them anywaySometimes we are blessed with being able to choose the time, and the arena, and the manner of our revolution, butusually we must do battle where we are standing Those of us who stand outside the circle of this society s definition of acceptable women those of us who have been forged in the crucibles of difference those of us who are poor, who are lesbians, who are Black, who are older know that survival is not an academic skill It is learning how to st...


  7. Holly Holly says:

    Very easy five star rating This is phenomenal The language is beautiful and the exploration of her identity as black, female and lesbian is fascinating Seriously, go and read it It will make your heart sing.


  8. Nathan Nathan says:

    I really wish I could teach this one day, but because I don t live in some sort of fantasy utopia I have to recognize that no PTA would ever leave me unscathed for choosing a book that talks so candidly and so beautifully about homosexua...


  9. Alissa Alissa says:

    I ve always felt a real affinity for the poetry of Lorde s writing, and somehow this was the only book of hers I could find at the library Whoa Absolutely beautiful, gripping language The lyricism that transforms sex into love The beauty of learning about yourself from the joy and pain of relationships I would read this over and over again, bathe in these words and the honesty and the reality of this This is also just a phenomenal cultural document, a portrait of queer life in the mi...


  10. Vincent Scarpa Vincent Scarpa says:

    I clearly stand alone in thinking this, and that s fine, but parts of this book were torture for me to get through Especially in the latter half of the book, wherein Lorde invents 1000 different ways to say she loves a cavalcade of women who, by the end, I truly couldn t tell apart I can appreciate the craft at work here, and that Lorde has a t...